KSA Quarterly Meeting - Register Now!

Register now for the next KSA Quarterly Meeting! This meeting is one you don't want to miss as the Kentucky Division of Water will be presenting information regarding the new draft MS4 permit. Attendance for all MS4s is strongly encouraged! To register, click here.

Date:

Friday, December 12

Time:

9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Location:

Department of Environmental Protection

300 Fair Oaks Lane

Frankfort, KY  40601

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 18 November 2014 02:00

KSA Welcomes You!

Welcome to the Kentucky Stormwater Association (KSA)! KSA supports collaboration, training and implementation with respect to stormwater permitting and solutions to improve the quality of Kentucky’s waterways. KSA provides forums for our members to interact and learn about the latest stormwater news, resources and implementation strategies through regular meetings, trainings and networking opportunities. 

 

What is Stormwater?

Stormwater is the flow of water that results from precipitation and immediately occurs following rainfall or snowmelt. When it rains, several things can happen to the precipitation.  Some of the precipitation infiltrates into the soil, some is taken up by plants, and some evaporates into the atmosphere.  Stormwater runoff is the rest of the precipitation that runs off land and impervious surfaces such as pavements and building rooftops.  These impervious surfaces do not allow rainfall to infiltrate into the soil like natural vegetation, causing more of the rainfall to become runoff.  There is more than water in stormwater. Runoff carries pollutants such as oil and grease, chemicals, nutrients, metals, and bacteria that accumulate on impervious surfaces.

 

Why Care about Stormwater?

Stormwater runoff impacts our lives in a number of ways.  As community development and impervious area increases, the quantity of runoff increases causing our waterways to carry more drainage/flood water.  Because storm water runoff picks up pollutants from these impervious surfaces, water quality decreases as well.  This can be seen in stream bank erosion and algae blooms, for example.  The increase in the amount of water and the speed of that water causes erosion of land areas and stream banks.  The increase in stormwater pollution affects us in ways that most people may not even realize.  Many pollutants are washed into our waterways from our communities when it rains: trash from our litter, oils and fluids from our vehicles, and fertilizers and pesticides from our lawns and farms.  The more pollutants that are washed into our waterways, the worse water quality becomes, which can cause health concerns for us as well as wildlife.

Last Updated on Thursday, 04 September 2014 00:37

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Don't Forget

KSA presentations from previous Meetings and Conferences  are posted on the website!

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